Microsoft Access Tutorial – How to use Input Masks

Microsoft Access Tutorial: How to use Input Masks

Microsoft Access databases provide a wealth of tools and utilities to help control design layouts and data integrity. Working with the latter, you can reduce and even dismiss any programming at all to control data entry to a field in a table or via a form using the Access Input Mask feature.

Take a quick look at this useful Microsoft Access tutorial (using version 2010) on how to set up an input mask.

httpvh://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PVz1bsc_oUM

Very easy to create indeed and the video covers the pre-set options which to be honest is based on the US style conventions for Continue reading “Microsoft Access Tutorial – How to use Input Masks”

Microsoft Access Queries: Difference Between The Where Clause And the Having Clause

Microsoft Access Queries: Difference Between The Where Clause And the Having Clause

Within the framework of using Microsoft Access queries, the HAVING clause can only be used with the GROUP BY type SQL statement which is also referred as the Groups and Totals query. The HAVING keyword when not used with the GROUP BY statement acts as a standard WHERE clause.

The HAVING clause specifies a condition that is similar to the purpose of a WHERE clause when  applying criteria but the two clauses are not interchangeable.

microsoft access queries difference between the where clause and the having clause

The key difference between these two keywords is Continue reading “Microsoft Access Queries: Difference Between The Where Clause And the Having Clause”