SQL Commands: MS Access SQL Versus SQL Server – The Differences

SQL Commands: MS Access SQL Versus SQL Server – The Differences

It’s a common mistake when MS Access developers assume their know SQL commands being common to all platforms. Yes, there is a common standard syntax but at the same time, there are variances between software systems.

It’s like choosing a flavour of ice cream; different tastes but it’s still ice cream and if you mix them, again different tastes but may not always be compatible to the palette!

I’ve seem many questions come up on forums about the differences and conversions between MS Access SQL and T-SQL (SQL Sever) which there are of course some differences between the two language syntax’s.

sql commands ms access sql server

So, here’s a few example SQL commands to help you out with or when needing Continue reading “SQL Commands: MS Access SQL Versus SQL Server – The Differences”

Microsoft Access Database Tutorial – How To Use Spellchecker On A MS Access Form

Microsoft Access Database Tutorial – How To Use Spellchecker On A MS Access Form

You’ve seen the Microsoft’s spell checker tool across Word, Excel and other Office applications and it’s even available within Microsoft Access database too.

When entering data into any input control, text box, memo fields or anywhere else users enter text, you can quickly call the spell checker tool using the keyboard shortcut F7.

microsoft access database spell checker tool f7

If you use MS Access forms and in all honesty, you should be using them, you could automate the spell checker tool on selective controls using Continue reading “Microsoft Access Database Tutorial – How To Use Spellchecker On A MS Access Form”

Microsoft Access Forms – How To Build Your Own MS Access Form Wizard

Microsoft Access Forms – How To Build Your Own MS Access Form Wizard

One of the many uses that Microsoft Access forms can be used for includes the ability to create your very own MS Access form wizard feature.

As you will be familiar with Microsoft Office in general, wizards are useful utilities that provide assistance for general users to complete a task that would otherwise take much longer to manually create step by step.

In MS Access alone, there are many wizard features around ranging from the query wizard to adding predefined (embedded) code for a command button.

Here’s an illustration of a custom form that I’ve built in the past which contains a four page screen for a user to scroll between using the navigation command buttons.

microsoft access form wizard

This wasn’t at all complicated and required very little Access VBA code too which developers Continue reading “Microsoft Access Forms – How To Build Your Own MS Access Form Wizard”

How to Convert Microsoft Access Macros To Visual Basic For Application VBA

How to Convert Microsoft Access Macros To Visual Basic For Application VBA

The scenario: You’ve inherited an Access database that was originally built way back say with version 97 and some of the forms have started to look a little tired (which is not an issue) and you discovered that when opening the database there are over 250 separate macro procedures which most were only useful for a single form.

What do you do? You certainly need to consider either tidying up the macros, grouping them in to some sort of logical sequence; reducing the number of Access objects, possibly embed them into your forms (which the newer versions tend to prefer) or convert Microsoft Access macros to Visual Basic using the converter tool.

Here’s a quick video tutorial I found which shows you how to convert a macro…

httpvh://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S1GHe-Da7yw

How to Convert Microsoft Access Macros To Visual Basic For Application VBA

You may wish to note that any external macro objects (that’s a macro which is found in the Navigation Pane) will be Continue reading “How to Convert Microsoft Access Macros To Visual Basic For Application VBA”